The storms killed hundreds of stray dogs in Stanislaus County

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People aren’t the only ones struggling with the impact of this season’s storms. More than 200 animals, mostly strays or dogs lost during the storms, were taken to the Stanislaus Animal Welfare Agency in California this week and need homes. “A lot of them are scared,” said SASA Executive Director Vaughn Morris. “You can hear them crying and barking in the background. It’s really a very sad situation.” The staff is working to reconnect the animals with their rightful owners. But with overcrowding and weather slowing adoptions, dozens are being sent to shelters in the most distant states. One of these partner shelters is located in Idaho, where dozens of dogs have already been sent to await new owners. The problem with this transition is that the agency does not have enough crates to safely and comfortably transfer the animals. They are currently asking the public to donate any new or used crates, especially for large dogs. More than 70% of the agency’s dogs weigh more than 50 pounds. SASA is also looking for temporary foster parents to help with the influx of stray dogs. Staff say adoptions have slowed due to the weather and the impact it has had on residents. The challenge is to find locals to accept them. “I think there are other communities right now that aren’t as inundated with stray dogs as what we’re seeing in Stanislaus County,” rescue coordinator Chandra Looney said. With more rain this week, SASA staff expect more animals to be under their care. “A lot of dogs don’t like being in the rain,” Looney said. “Thunder and lightning can scare a dog.” Morris also hopes that people will volunteer for simple tasks like coming and spending time with the animals. – They are beautiful animals – said Morris. “We love each and every one of them and want to make sure they get the right result and find a good home as soon as possible.” Watch the video above for the full story.

People aren’t the only ones struggling with the impact of this season’s storms.

More than 200 animals, mostly strays or dogs lost during the storm, were taken to the Stanislaus Animal Welfare Agency in California this week and need homes.

“A lot of them are scared,” said SASA Executive Director Vaughn Morris. “You can hear them crying and barking in the background. This is really a very sad situation.”

Staff are working to reconnect the animals with their rightful owners. But with overcrowding and weather slowing adoptions, dozens are being sent to shelters in the most distant states.

One of these partner shelters is located in Idaho, where dozens of dogs have already been sent to await new owners.

The problem with this transition is that the agency does not have enough crates to transport the animals safely and comfortably. They are currently asking the public to donate any new or used crates, especially for large dogs. More than 70% of the agency’s dogs weigh more than 50 pounds.

SASA is also looking for temporary foster parents to help with the influx of stray dogs.

Staff say adoptions have slowed due to the weather and the impact it has had on residents. The challenge is to find locals to accept them.

“I think there are other communities right now that aren’t as inundated with stray dogs as what we’re seeing in Stanislaus County,” rescue coordinator Chandra Looney said.

With more rainfall this week, SASA staff are expecting many more animals to come into their care.

“A lot of dogs don’t like being in the rain,” Looney said. “Thunder and lightning can scare a dog.”

Morris also hopes that people will volunteer for simple tasks like coming and spending time with the animals.

– They are beautiful animals – said Morris. “We love each and every one of them and want to make sure they have the right outcome and find a good home as soon as possible.”

Watch the video above for the full story.

The storms killed hundreds of stray dogs in Stanislaus County

Source link The storms killed hundreds of stray dogs in Stanislaus County