“All Bodies Are Good Bodies”: Raising Awareness of Eating Disorders during NEDA Week

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National Eating Disorders Awareness Week began on Monday and will run until Friday to educate people about eating disorders and provide hope, support and visibility to people affected by eating disorders.
National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (Photo: Sydney Bouchelle / WWAY)

WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) – National Eating Disorders Awareness Week began Monday and will run through Friday to educate people about eating disorders and provide hope, support and visibility to people affected by eating disorders.

Megan Shapiro, clinical director of the Chrysalis Eating Disorders Counseling and Treatment Center in Wilmington, says the three behaviors classify disorderly eating.

“One is overeating, it’s when a person consumes a lot of food and feels like he’s getting out of control when he eats. Another is the restriction, when a person by many means restricts the consumption of food. And compensation is when a person eats food and feels that he has to compensate for what he ate by exercising or sometimes cleansing or laxatives, ”Shapiro said.

Shapiro says the number of people over the past two years, the fight against eating disorders has become more frequentsaying the CDC reported a 50 percent increase in the number of people with eating disorder symptoms in emergency departments before the pandemic.

“50 percent of women and about 30 percent of men experience some eating disorder during their lifetime. So it affects many people, ”Shapiro said. “Our ecological cause of disorderly nutrition is the idealization of thinness in our society.”

Although she says the body positive was something useful, she says there is still work to be done.

“The idea that a person living in a body that is not an idealized body in our society has to work hard to evaluate their body is included in this and again, I think there’s some message in that he is not in order and they will figure out how to be in order, ”Shapiro said. “So I think it’s a more neutral body position and just knowing that all bodies are good bodies.”

Violations do not have a specific “look”. Shapiro says that people of all sizes, cultures and communities can experience disordered eating, and malnutrition is equally harmful, regardless of whether you are very thin or live in a more “normal” size.

If you or any of your acquaintances may be struggling with an eating disorder, visit the NEDA website.



“All Bodies Are Good Bodies”: Raising Awareness of Eating Disorders during NEDA Week

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